A dozen miles off the coast of Pemuteran, only accessible by sea on guided tours, Menjangan Island contains a nice coral reef in a paradisiacal setting. On the reef drop-off you will find angelfish, clownfish and thick shoals of chromis moving above a well preserved coral cover. Pulau Menjangan is a snorkeling spot not to be missed in Bali.

Snorkeling at Menjangan Island, Bali

How to get there?

Pulau Menjangan is a small unspoilt island accessible only by boat. It is part of the Bali Barat National Park, and it is forbidden to spend the night there. The easiest option for visiting this spot is to go on a full-day tour, on offer from many companies everywhere in Bali. Most tours leave from Pemuteran, to the north of the island (from there, it takes an hour by boat to reach Pulau Menjangan). The price is about $80 per person for a day tour, including visits to several snorkeling spots and a lunch break.

Menjangan Island snorkeling map, Bali

Water entrance

You enter the water either from the beach or from the guide’s boat. In the second case, follow the guide’s instructions.

Exploration

The spot to explore covers a wide area between the beach and the reef drop-off, about 150 to 200 yards apart. From the beach, you will cross a few dozen yards of sandy sea bed and rock (↕3-6ft/1-2 m), then sea bed covered with soft coral (↕3-10ft/1-3 m) as far as the reef drop-off.

Blue sea star at Menjangan Island, Bali

Although there are interesting things to see in the reef flat (batfish, giant clams and blue starfish living in the rocky crevices), the spectacle takes on another dimension when you get closer to the reef drop-off. Here, the sea bed is spectacular: thick shoals of green chromis and sergeant majors move around the coral beds, while parrotfish, butterflyfish and Java spinefoot, with spectacular colors, come and go on the reef drop-off. This spot is particularly rich in soft coral (sarcophyton, xenia…). Several species of angelfish, including sixbar angelfish and royal angelfish are easy to see. Try to find a sea anemone between the rocks: most of them contain ocellaris clownfish, better known to children as “Nemo”. In the deep blue of the reef drop-off, you may also have the chance to see a green sea turtle or hawksbill sea turtle, although they are shy here.

Snorkeling with ocellaris clownfish at Pulau Menjangan, Bali

Pulau Menjangan, as all Bali coral reefs, tend to decline quickly in places. The reef drop-off, which was exceptionally well preserved a few years ago, has now broken or dead coral in some areas.

This is one of the most popular spots near Bali. A large number of boats and guided tours stop here. Watch out for other people when you are in the water.

Restaurants & accommodation

Pulau Menjangan is a natural site. There are no hotels or restaurants, but most tours include meals. Ask your tour guide for details, and at least take along a snack and something to drink.



 

  • Level required Intermediary
  • Protected areaBali Barat National Park
  • Maximum depth25ft/8m
  • Water entranceFrom the beach or a boat
  • LifeguardNo
  • Visitor numbersHigh
  • Access costsSnorkeling tour price
  • Restaurants nearbyNo
  • Public toilets & showersNo

MAP Spot

These spots are accessible to anyone with basic snorkeling skills, and feeling comfortable in the water and with his snorkeling gear. You will enter the water from the shore (beach, pontoon, ladder, rocks) or from a boat. The water height in the sea entrance area is reasonable, but you will not necessarily be within your depth. Moderate currents can occur in the area, even when the sea conditions are good. The distance to swim to reach the most interesting snorkeling areas of the spot does not exceed 200 meters.

This level only apply when the spot experiences optimal sea and/or weather conditions. It is not applicable if the sea and/or weather conditions deteriorate, in particular in the presence of rough sea, rain, strong wind, unusual current, large tides, waves and/or swell. You can find more details about the definition of our snorkeling levels on our snorkeling safety page.